Posts tagged brooklyn
290_Justin Heu: Density n Void

Submission #290 | Justin Heu: Density n Void — “A brief focus into designing a new urban mixed use building... residential, commercial, office space. Redesigning what we formally know about a building and warping it inside out. Residential units are encapsulated into tunnel like voids that face each other and can hide away with privacy smart glass.”

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219_Peter Hsi: Inner Skyline

Submission #219 | Peter Hsi: Inner Skyline — "Gentrification in Brooklyn have transformed the cultural representation by inviting and enriching the thinking of a better life. Carrying on with that new development in Brooklyn, I believe these changes needs to happen in a much smaller scale."

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204_Ellen Wong: Homonym Typology 

Submission #204 | Ellen Wong: Homonym Typology — "Within Homonym Typology, a suburban house is no longer an isolated entity, it engages with neighboring units to form a community. Each unit have common formation parts to spatial whole relationship. Each duplex is made up of two uniquely designed units which are fused together to create a set of relationships which the experience of duality of the unit is completed, the full function of a house is achieved through the connection."

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115_Greg Sheward: RISE

Submission #115 | Greg Sheward: RISE — New York City’s population has continuously been on the rise, expected to reach 9 million people over the next 23 years. The need for affordable housing is playing a predominant roll in this growth. This increasing need for housing provides an opportunity for housing to play a prevailing role in the advancement of architecture. Housing has fallen victim to the standardization of the New York City building code.

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59_Graham Rose: Shifting Spirals

Graham Rose: Shifting Spirals — Essentially we had to create a folly that was semi habitable for people or any creature depending on your design. We had to utilize two design approaches that we had been working with all semester. The project was initially limited to an 18’x18’x18’ cube but we were allowed to break the barrier if it was necessary and made sense.

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